Materials

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Metals

When selecting an extensometer to test metals, it is important to consider test standards and product requirements, as well as material characteristics such as size, shape, composition and ductility. Simplicity, flexibility and ergonomics may be part of your decision criteria to ensure a best fit.  This section provides general guidance and relevant information for you to consider when evaluating various extensometer solutions.

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Plastics

When selecting an extensometer, it is important to consider test standards and requirements, material attributes, current and future needs and what characteristics are best suited for your particular lab’s function. Consider simplicity, flexibility, and ergonomics in your decision criteria to ensure a best fit. This section provides general guidance and relevant information for you to consider when evaluating various extensometer solutions.

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Composites

Composites are materials made up of two or more constituent materials with significantly different properties. The most common type of composites used are made of long fibers embedded in a resin matrix.

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Biomaterials

Testing biomaterials such as soft and hard tissue presents many unique challenges for those in the biomedical field. Biomaterials often require testing that is highly sensitive to low force and small displacements in tension, compression, flexure, and fatigue. In addition to this, most biomaterials testing needs to be performed in conditions that mimic the physiological environment. These materials can either be derived from nature or synthesized in a laboratory. When selecting a strain solution, it is important to consider material attributes, if in vitro test conditions are required, and the minimum and maximum amount of displacement needed to obtain results. This section provides general guidance and relevant information for you to consider when evaluating various strain solutions for testing biomaterials.

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Textiles

When testing textile materials it's important to consider the material properties. Since textiles are made up of fibers, they can have very high tensile strength but they lack compressive strength and are fragile. Contacting extensometers may bend the specimen or damage the material with the sharp knife edges, non-contacting extensometers are recommended to prevent these issues.

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Which Testing Solution is Best for My Material?

Non-Contacting

Non Contacting Extensometers Learn More

Bonded Strain Sensors

Bonded Strain Sensors Learn More

Contacting

Contacting Extensometers Learn More

Special Use

Special Use Learn More